Wilderness

World Wilderness Congress offers chance to help solve global issues

Homer has played an important role in Alaska’s environmental history because we have long believed that we can “think globally while acting locally.”

Indeed as the world gets still smaller, we realize that most of what we learned about ourselves and the world was learned in the last decade. New information and technology can empower us as we strive for a sustainable future for our grandchildren. 

McBride writes book about lodge

Kachemak Bay Wilderness Lodge owner and author Michael McBride has written and had published “The Last Wilderness: Alaska’s Rugged Coast,” a memoir about living and raising a family at his lodge in China Poot Bay. With his wife, Diana McBride, he has lived at the lodge for almost 50 years. The book tells his  story of pursuing a dream of living at a wilderness location and the many people he has met there.

3 Homer youths to participate in World Wilderness Congress

For Traven Apiki, a 2012 Homer High School graduate, maintaining a close relationship to the outdoors and encouraging others to do the same is essential.

“Everywhere I’ve lived, I’ve always been able to see water from my house or been able to walk to it within minutes,” he said. “That’s something I never want to change.”

U.N. Environmental Assembly compliments Homer, CACS

o the people of Kachemak Bay and friends and supporters of The Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies:
Working for the United Nations and its Environment Programme (UNEP) is not a straightforward matter as we often do not see the results of our efforts until later, and sometimes much later, than the day we finish the project or report that consumes us in the short term.

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