Homer Alaska - News

Story last updated at 4:42 PM on Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Driver indicted on new charge in car crash that killed visitor



By Michael Armstrong
Staff Writer

A driver charged in the 2010 Memorial Day weekend car crash that killed a Washington, D.C., woman has been indicted by a Kenai grand jury on a new charge of manslaughter. Alfred Jones, 49, had previously been charged with second-degree murder, assault, driving under the influence and drug possession. The indictment now charges him with second-degree murder, manslaughter, seven counts of third-degree assault, driving under the influence and fourth-degree misconduct involving a controlled substance, methamphetamines. All but the DUI charge are felonies.

Jones drove a GMC pickup truck that hit a Subaru Forester, killing a passenger, Kathleen Benz, 25, of Washington, D.C. Charging documents allege a blood analysis for Jones tested positive for methamphetamines, oxycodone, cocaine and marijuana.

Jones had served a 15-month sentence in Nevada on a federal conviction of money laundering for his part in a conspiracy to launder money and distribute oxycodone in Alaska that had been smuggled up from Nevada. That indictment alleged Jones deposited drug money at Wells Fargo banks in Kenai and Soldotna between July and August 2010. He was about to be released from jail when the Alaska charges were filed and a warrant issued for his arrest. According to online records, Jones is in transit with the Bureau of Prisons and not yet in state custody.

Jones also has been named as a defendant in a civil suit by Allstate Insurance, the insurer for Daniel Fair- child, the driver of the car Benz rode in. Allstate paid $9,800 for medical claims paid on behalf of Fairchild and other passengers in the car. The lawsuit seeks a judgment in an amount to be proven at trial as well as interest and attorney and court fees.

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