Web posted Wednesday, May 8, 2002

photo: culture

 
Bunnell Street Gallery's annual Edible Arts Show on New Year's Eve is a popular stop for revelers with an appetite for the unusual.

Arts, galleries: Homer, Kachemak Bay known as arts capital of Alaska


Homer is renowned throughout Alaska as having one of the most active communities of artists in the state. Many enjoy statewide reputations, producing and marketing work in a variety of genres, media and formats.

The area's natural beauty is a source of inspiration for potters, painters, printmakers, jewelers, weavers, sculptors and stained-glass workers. Their work can be seen in local galleries and exhibitions. Some of the artists, in addition, invite the public to visit their studios. Other Alaska artwork can be found in the gift shops of the area.

A good introduction to Homer's ever-changing arts scene is to participate in the monthly event known locally as "First Friday." Most galleries in town keep an exhibit on display for one month, and celebrate the debut of the new show on the first Friday of every month. It typically begins around 5:30 p.m. with opening receptions held simultaneously at the galleries -- Bunnell Street Gallery, Ptarmigan Arts and Fireweed Gallery, and sometimes the Pratt Museum, Picture Alaska Art Gallery, the Art Shop Gallery and the Sea Lion. When you've had your fill at one, move on to the next.

Only slightly less glamorous than opening night on Broadway, First Friday is a monthly highlight of the Homer arts scene. It's an opportunity for the avid arts enthusiast to share the excitement of an unveiling, and to meet the artists who brought the works to life. If you plan to be in Homer on such a calendar event, don't miss First Friday. No reservations are needed -- just show up as you are. And keep in mind that many artists hold slide shows and talks before or after their opening receptions, providing additional insight into their creative processes. The events are always free. Check the Homer News when you get to town for the latest art news.

photo: culture

 
Sydney Bishop's works are on display with many of her neighbors at the Experience Gallery in Halibut Cove, across the Bay from Homer.

If the hubbub surrounding an opening reception sounds too strenuous or otherwise doesn't fit your schedule, take your own tour of Homer's galleries another morning or afternoon. Several of Homer's most vibrant and active arts venues are next door to or across the street from each other on Pioneer Avenue. Ptarmigan Arts, a collective in which member artists man the cash register, is across from Picture Alaska and next door to Fireweed Gallery. At the other end of Pioneer Avenue is the octagonal building that houses the Art Shop Gallery, which is a short walk from the Pratt Museum, located on Bartlett Street. Walk or drive down Main Street to where it nears Kachemak Bay and you'll find Bunnell Street Gallery. Others are located on the Spit and around Anchor Point.

Halibut Cove has a large artist population and is a must-see for arts enthusiasts. Visitors who take the ferry Danny J are given plenty of time to meander the boardwalks on Ismailof Island, where they can see many Cove artists' work on display at the Experience Gallery. Diana Tillion has a studio just around the corner, and Alex Combs has one of his own. Together they make a delightful afternoon of viewing pleasure.

CAPTION:Halibut Cove painter and sculptor Alex Combs won the Juror's Choice Award at the 1999 Alaska Juried Painting Exhibition for "Fish Camp Ritual #1." One of Alaska's best-known artists, he shows in Homer and Halibut Cove.

CAPTION:Marian Beck's paintings drift through galleries all over Alaska, but especially in Homer and Halibut Cove.

photo: culture

 
Marian Beck's paintings drift through galleries all over Alaska, but especially in Homer and Halibut Cove.

Homer is renowned throughout Alaska as having one of the most active communities of artists in the state. Many enjoy statewide reputations, producing and marketing work in a variety of genres, media and formats.

The area's natural beauty is a source of inspiration for potters, painters, printmakers, jewelers, weavers, sculptors and stained-glass workers. Their work can be seen in local galleries and exhibitions. Some of the artists, in addition, invite the public to visit their studios. Other Alaska artwork can be found in the gift shops of the area.

A good introduction to Homer's ever-changing arts scene is to participate in the monthly event known locally as "First Friday." Most galleries in town keep an exhibit on display for one month, and celebrate the debut of the new show on the first Friday of every month. It typically begins around 5:30 p.m. with opening receptions held simultaneously at the galleries -- Bunnell Street Gallery, Ptarmigan Arts and Fireweed Gallery, and sometimes the Pratt Museum, Picture Alaska Art Gallery, the Art Shop Gallery and the Sea Lion. When you've had your fill at one, move on to the next.

Only slightly less glamorous than opening night on Broadway, First Friday is a monthly highlight of the Homer arts scene. It's an opportunity for the avid arts enthusiast to share the excitement of an unveiling, and to meet the artists who brought the works to life. If you plan to be in Homer on such a calendar event, don't miss First Friday. No reservations are needed -- just show up as you are. And keep in mind that many artists hold slide shows and talks before or after their opening receptions, providing additional insight into their creative processes. The events are always free. Check the Homer News when you get to town for the latest art news.

photo: culture

 
Halibut Cove painter and sculptor Alex Coombs won the Juror's Coice Award at the 1999 Alaska Juried Painting Exhibition for "Fish Camp Ritual #1." One of Alaska's best-known artists, he shows in Homer and Halibut Cove.

If the hubbub surrounding an opening reception sounds too strenuous or otherwise doesn't fit your schedule, take your own tour of Homer's galleries another morning or afternoon. Several of Homer's most vibrant and active arts venues are next door to or across the street from each other on Pioneer Avenue. Ptarmigan Arts, a collective in which member artists man the cash register, is across from Picture Alaska and next door to Fireweed Gallery. At the other end of Pioneer Avenue is the octagonal building that houses the Art Shop Gallery, which is a short walk from the Pratt Museum, located on Bartlett Street. Walk or drive down Main Street to where it nears Kachemak Bay and you'll find Bunnell Street Gallery. Others are located on the Spit and around Anchor Point.

Halibut Cove has a large artist population and is a must-see for arts enthusiasts. Visitors who take the ferry Danny J are given plenty of time to meander the boardwalks on Ismailof Island, where they can see many Cove artists' work on display at the Experience Gallery. Diana Tillion has a studio just around the corner, and Alex Combs has one of his own. Together they make a delightful afternoon of viewing pleasure.

photo: culture

 
Hand-blown glass ornaments and other works by Homer Artist Michelle Bournonville are on display at Ptarmigan Arts, Sea Lion Gallery and North Wind Fine Gifts.

CONTACT US

ADVERTISING

SUBSCRIBER SERVICES

SOCIAL NETWORKING

MORRIS ALASKA NEWS