Point of View

Nothing like enjoying dawn of new day with canine pal

I’m one of those offbeat types who enjoys the early morning hours where the eastern sky has yet to develop its personality and merely glows with a muted silver patina.

It gives me time to have my first cup of fresh ground coffee before stepping out on the deck to inhale the scintillating breath of the ocean’s morning air and let out our psycho dogs to rediscover everything that they excitedly detected the previous day and then promptly forgot about. It’s as if they start their life all over again every time they touch down on the dew-laden grass.

People’s voice needs representation

Some years ago as I stood in the national archives building and read from the original copy of our Constitution, and the Bill of Rights, I could not help but reflect on Lincoln’s closing words in his Gettysburg address ”...and that government of  the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”

Leadership means viable solutions

I first ran for Homer City Council more than three years ago, because I wanted to put a simple idea to the test — Could an elected official be someone I could trust and respect and still get re-elected? Can a politician be transparent, clear on his position, approach each issue with regard for evidence rather than preconception? Can people tolerate or even appreciate issued-based discourse?

Can Benghazi committee shed light on U.S. violence?

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oday, the House Select Committee on Benghazi is going to convene again, after 30 congressional committee hearings that have been held on the rampage in Benghazi, Libya, that left our ambassador and four other Americans dead in 2012. When the final report on Benghazi is completed, sometime in 2016, it will be the longest congressional investigation in U.S. history.

Kachemak City plays key role as ‘good neighbor’

Homer’s eastern neighbor, Kachemak City, is a bit of an enigma to many folks at  our end of the Kenai Peninsula. It is a tiny, irregularly shaped city with one-tenth the population of Homer. It doesn’t even have its own zip code.

  What it does have, though, is a long history, longer by three years than Homer itself, and a governing philosophy that argues that the best government is less government.  It is a  self-sufficient, frugal community led by a mayor and city council.

Alaskans can proudly celebrate their seafood

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ctober is National Seafood Month. This month we’re looking to spread the word to eat more Alaska seafood — it’s good for your health. Alaskans can be proud that our state and offshore federal fisheries produce more than 60 percent of the nation’s domestic seafood harvest. Alaska’s production of more than 5.5 billion pounds is more than the whole nation consumes.

Alaska seafood has a positive brand image across the nation that helps every Alaskan.  

There’s a group of children in Haiti who could use a little help from you

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mericans are charitable souls. Everyone will agree that it feels good to help someone who truly is in need and uses the charity they receive not only to survive but also to better themselves. Many people find it difficult to give because they are not sure if their donations ever make it to the intended source. 

Debunking some recycling myths heard in Homer

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o we or don’t we recycle in Homer? Have you ever driven up to the Homer Transfer Facility baler building and seen the recyclables pushed onto the conveyor belt like garbage in the old days? And you thought, “What the heck? I take my time to sort out recyclables from my trash and the borough is just going to throw it away?” 

Do you walk away really mad but never ask staff what is really going on?

What’s happening with U.S. economy at heart of state, city financial woes

Thank you to Homer City Council Member Francie Roberts for nine years of thoughtful, caring leadership on the council and as Mayor Pro Tem. On a personal level you have been a great mentor and colleague to me both with the council and on the KBBI board. I hope you enjoy the free time that opens up now that you don’t have all the council work, even if you have to stick it out through October.

Prepare for opportunity disguised as something that looks like a loss

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he 12th annual enactment of the Burning Basket interactive, impermanent art was a brilliant success. A giant intricately woven basket and labyrinth were created by people of all ages. Nearly 100 hours were donated to gather materials and to build the installations, with over 30 people participating, as well as 80 students and teachers from Fireweed Academy who came to add their special creative touch, thanks one and all.

Time for city residents to face the music

We’ve grown so accustomed to reading about federal and state government deficit spending that people’s eyes start to glaze over when the talk turns to Homer’s own budget dilemma. As civic leaders ask us for solutions we end up with so many opinions that it’s hard to know where to begin. In the final analysis the cost of government is all about taxes.  And if we are smart, taxes should be all about fairness. 

Court fight over water rights raises question:Whose side is DNR on?

As water becomes more of valuable commodity in the United States, competition between public and private uses for this resource is heating up. This has caused a disturbing trend in governmental sector which seems to be succumbing to political pressure to side more often with corporate interest wishing to privatize water use. 

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