Homer's Best Bets

Here’s the problem of living in a small town that grows by a few hundred people in the summer. For most of the year we hang out with folks we’ve come to know and sort of tolerate — maybe even love. It’s not that our neighbors are necessarily wonderful human beings, but that over time we have learned all their quirks and foibles.

Walker limits PFD payouts to $1,000

ANCHORAGE — Facing a multibillion-dollar deficit, the Alaska governor on Wednesday cut in half the annual checks that give all residents a share of the state’s oil wealth, but he kept enough money in place to award everyone a $1,000 payout.

Gov. Bill Walker had said recently that all budget-cutting options were on the table, raising the prospect that he might do away with the checks entirely. They have been distributed for more than three decades and last year climbed to a record $2,072.

Anchorage attorney Jahna Lindemuth named new AG

Gov. Bill Walker’s cabinet is finally whole again.

Walker introduced Anchorage attorney Jahna Lindemuth as Alaska’s new attorney general at a Tuesday afternoon press conference.

Lindemuth replaces former Attorney General Craig Richards who resigned abruptly June 23 citing personal reasons.

Walker said he was “struck” by her “passion for Alaska.” He referenced more than 950 hours of pro bono work she did in 2015 representing a victim of domestic violence and a wrongly convicted defendant in the very public “Fairbanks Four” case.

The Exchange, a pilot syringe exchange program, offers free syringe exchanges every other Tuesday at the South Peninsula Hospital Training Center, 203 West Pioneer Avenue, in the southwest corner of the building. Exchanges are held 5-7 p.m. The next Exchange is July 5. The Exchange is a program established and operated by a group of individuals and agency representatives in the Homer area that support the idea of harm-reduction and safer drug use as a means of making our community a safer place to live.

Clay, wood featured in First Friday shows

Heading into the Fourth of July weekend, July openings celebrate a freedom not often noted in art: media, not just subject.

At Bunnell Street Arts Center, Halibut Cove artist Annette Bellamy continues her experimentation with clay art forms.

Bellamy has become known for using clay as a sculptural medium, shaping works that seem everyday and stripping form almost to the abstract. Like Antoinette Walker, also showing at Bunnell, Bellamy comes from a commercial fishing background.

Both artists explore maritime themes, with Walker painting highly detailed encaustics.

First Friday

Art Shop Gallery

202 W. Pioneer Ave.

New work by Taz Talley

5-7:30 p.m., First Friday Opening Reception

Homer photographer Taz Tally shows his new image of fireweed casting its seed, along with other black and white images printed on metal.

Bunnell Street Arts Center

106 W. Bunnell Ave.

Encaustic painting by Antoinette Walker

Ceramic art by Annette Bellamy

5-7 p.m., First Friday Opening Reception; 6 p.m., artists talk

Choose scent-free varieties when bringing flowers to the hospital

Thank you to the many residents who bring beautiful flowers to the hospital and long term care to brighten up the day of a loved one. Just a friendly reminder that fragrant flowers are not permitted in any of the hospital owned buildings. People with allergies, asthma and respiratory difficulties can be adversely affected by strong smells, especially when already ill. Please choose only scent-free varieties when taking floral gifts to a friend or loved one.

Thank you for your assistance.

Derotha Ferraro

University of Alaska is rising to occasion

There was a time in Alaska when leadership was seized by those who had inexhaustible enthusiasm and strong motivation to address the challenges faced by our state. Today, our leaders face demands – financial, social and educational – that are daunting. Now, more than ever, is the time for Alaskans to step up and join together to address our state’s challenges and seize our opportunities.

Assembly service area vote could affect Ninilchik Health Clinic

A Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly vote on July 25 could eliminate my ability to work at the Ninilchik clinic.

Many of you have been hearing in the local news this week about the proposal coming up for vote at the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly meeting on Monday, July 25, to move the Central Peninsula Hospital service area line further south.

What many local resident aren’t aware of is the direct and severe impact that this proposal may have on the availability of medical services in Ninilchik.

For the Shire! LARP group includes fun for all ages

Every Saturday from 4-7 p.m. in Homer, often at Karen Hornaday Park, brave warriors fight evil lizards, or escort a princess with a flag across a battlefield, or simply take part in a free-for-all death match.

But it’s not as violent and bloody as it sounds.

The arrow tips are made of cloth-stuffed socks and the swords forged of foam. Most weapons weigh about as much, or less, as the average foam swimming pool noodle. However, to the subjects of the Shire of IceFire Bay, the glory — and fun — of the games are quite real.

Early birds catch the kings; Cook Inlet halibut heating up

Last week was amazing for numerous fishing fanatics pursuing fins on the lower peninsula — especially if they were able to drag their gluteal regions out of the horizontal position at quasi-dark-thirty.

Unless you have a vampire dangling from a branch of your family tree, it won’t kill you to start flinging lures around dawn’s early light.

Turk and Willie went after the silver beasts gliding up the Anchor on June 22, and claimed they stepped through a time warp straight into the halcyon and nostalgic days of primo fishing.

Red Chair reaches the end of the road

Many of us know well traveled people. Perhaps they spent a year studying abroad, or a month rambling across Asia, backpacking across Europe, or working in an orphanage in South America. Maybe — as is the case of one red chair — they are slowing checking off every state in the union. The Red Chair, a wandering dump swap salvage that started its journey in 2011, has come all the way to Homer.

Homer resident still holds top seat for halibut derby

Palmer resident still holds
top spot in halibut derby

Two more anglers caught tagged fish in the week of June 13. However, none overthrew Marcella Kolberg of Palmer from her seat as the current Jackpot Halibut leader. Kolberg caught a 142.4 pound halibut on May 29.

Karla Fischer of Garrison, N.D., caught a 2016 tagged fish aboard North Country Charters on June 14, winning $250.

Gillian Glidewell of Anchorage caught a 2016 tagged fish while fishing with Alaska Saltwater Adventures on June 16, winning $500.

Syringe exchange provides health services, sterile tools

If an intravenous drug user goes into The Exchange at the South Peninsula Hospital Training Center to dispose of their used needles, they can receive a “safer injection kit,” condoms, Narcan overdose response kits, free rapid HIV and Hepatitis C tests, and other health-related information.

They will not receive judgment or scrutiny from the police department, said Catriona Reynolds, Homer city council member and organizer for The Exchange.

Deputy KES chief gets bail in sex abuse case

Homer District Court Judge Margaret Murphy set bail and conditions of release on Wednesday for Stephen R. Boyle, 43, a Homer man charged with six counts of first-degree sexual abuse of a minor. Boyle is the deputy fire chief for Kachemak Emergency Services.

At his hearing yesterday, Kenai Peninsula Borough Human Resources manager Story Brown said that because of the seriousness of the charges Boyle had been placed on administrative leave. Brown asked that as a condition of his release, Boyle not be on the premises of KES fire stations. Murphy granted that request.

Pages

Subscribe to Homer News RSS