Elks holds holiday party for local Coast Guard

The Homer Elks Lodge #2127 on Dec. 14, 2017, held its second annual U.S. Coast Guard Holiday Appreciation Dinner for personnel and families of the U.S.C.G. vessels Naushon and Hickory. Adults enjoyed a prime rib dinner and music by Burnt Down House while a pizza party with games and movies was held for children. Attendign were 80 audlts and 35 children. . The event played host to 80 adults and 35 children. “Special thanks to Fat Olives and Homer Emblem Club #350 for their respective roles in making this event a success,” said Elks Lodge #2127 Exalted Leader Tom Stroozas.

Chamber unveils new tourism guide cover

A full house of members attended the annual meeting of the Homer Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center held Tuesday at the Best Western Bidarka Inn. Chamber director Debbie Speakman introduced new and returning board members and announced the winners of the chamber’s photo contest. Board President Kari Ann Baker also unveiled the cover of the 2018 tourism and recreation guide, with an image of a soaring eagle by photographer Collin Walker.

Best Bets

“For a brief moment Sunday, the southernmost tip of Alaska was warmer than the southernmost tip of Florida.”

Could false nuke alert happen on the Kenai Peninsula?

In September 2014, the National Weather System sent out a false tsunami alarm, triggering tsunami warning sirens in Homer. As happened last Saturday in Hawaii when a technician clicked the wrong box on a program and sent out text alerts of an impending missile attack, the 2014 glitch also happened when a live code got sent out inadvertently. With increased tension over a possible nuclear missile attack from North Korea, those events raise the question: Could a false alert of a missile attack be sent out in Alaska, and if so, how fast would it be corrected? Chances are slim that local authorities would send out a false message like the one that sent Hawaii residents into a panic, Dan Nelson, program manager at Kenai Peninsula Borough Office of Emergency Management, said.

Local pot business expecting slight chill from federal change

The practicalities of running a state-legal business based on a federally-illegal product have became more complicated in some respects but unchanged in others, after U.S Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced changes last week that may enable federal marijuana prosecution in states such as Alaska that have legalized the drug.

Kayak building class keeps ancient Inuit art alive

I gently set my new skin-on-frame sea kayak into the Mariner Slough, and then shoehorned myself into the tight cockpit. As I readied myself, the outgoing current tried to pull me loose from the shore. I set my paddle to lock me into place while I secured my neoprene spray skirt around the opening and pulled on gloves. At the mouth of the slough and all along the shore, 4 to 6-foot waves crashed, the water being most dynamic where the current met the waves. I set my eyes on this zone, studied it for a minute, took a breath and shoved off. How the new-to-me kayak would handle big waves was a mystery and one I was anxious to solve.

Brooke Addison Buzga

Brooke Addison Buzga was born at 8:29 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018 at South Peninsula Hospital in Homer to Jaimee and David Buzga of Anchor Point. She weighed 8 pounds, 4 ounces. Her grandparents are Barb and John Baker of Auburn, Washington, and Dianna and Guy Buzga of Troy, Idaho. Brooke was the first baby born at South Peninsula Hospital in 2018.

Town Crier

Kachemak Emergency Service Area Board will be holding their regular monthly board meeting at 7 p.m. today, Jan. 11. The meeting will be held at the McNeil Canyon Fire Station, 53048 Ashwood Ave. (Mile 12 East End Rd.). The public is welcome to attend. Call 235-9811 for more information.

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