News

HoWL hosts clean-up week

With Earth Day coming up on Sunday, several area organizations tend to offer ways for the community to get involved and help make Homer a cleaner place. One such organization, Homer Wilderness Leaders, extends that opportunity to kids.

Post, Kettle honored as lifelong learners

The annual Celebration of Lifelong Learning honors adult learner Lee Post, a longtime Homer resident known as “the Bone -man,” and youth learner Ben Kettle. Held at 7 p.m. Saturday at the Homer Public Library and hosted by the Friends of the Homer Library (FHL), the celebration honors both a local adult and a youth who have demonstrated a perpetual love of learning.

Shein visits Homer on campaign tour

Pitching himself as “standing for honest progressive values,” Democratic Party candidate Dimitri Shein visited Homer on Monday as part of his campaign to defeat Congressman Don Young. Shein faces fellow Anchorage candidates Gregory Jones and Alyse Galvin to win the Democratic Party nomination, although Galvin is running as undeclared or independent. Under Democratic Party rules allowing independents to run for the party nomination, Galvin could win the nomination.

Bagley proposes SPH service area change

An ordinance proposed by Kenai Borough Assembly Member and Vice-President Dale Bagley would dramatically change the South Peninsula Hospital Service Area by moving the current boundary south of Ninilchik. The new east-west boundary would run roughly along Oil Well Road. The ordinance comes up for introduction at the April 3 meeting in Soldotna and a public hearing at the May 1 meeting.

Homer embraces solar energy

Talking about solar energy on the cusp of spring might seem optimistic. While daylight gets longer and the temperature warms, the weather flips between gloomy clouds and brisk winds. Last Thursday, March 22, at a presentation, “Solar Energy in Alaska,” at the Alaska Islands and Ocean Visitor Center, speakers gushed with enthusiasm.

Crafting a handmade life at Homer Folk School

Weaving and fermentation are called folk skills these days, as though from a bygone era. As though, in their dissolving into industrial manufacturing they’ve disappeared entirely, instead of only retreated from sight, outsourced and specialized. Yet while they may seem distant, fermentation and weaving are parts of everyday life. Many drink coffee, beer and wine, use vinegar and soy sauce, and eat cheese, chocolate, and salami, all products of fermentation, as well as have woven clothing, curtains, and rugs. We are just disconnected from their source.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - News