Homer rallies against racism

  • People demonstrating against the events of Charlottesville, Va., and other white supremacist rallies stand up against racism at WKFL Park in Homer on Sunday afternoon. About 50 people attended the one-hour event held from 3-4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017 in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong, Homer News)
  • People demonstrating against the events of Charlottesville, Va., and other white supremacist rallies stand up against racism at WKFL Park in Homer on Sunday afternoon. About 50 people attended the one-hour event held from 3-4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017 in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong, Homer News)
  • Darrel Oliver holds a mirror at a protest against the events of Charlottesville, Va., and other white supremacist rallies. He joined about 50 people who stood up against racism at WKFL Park in Homer from 3-4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017 in Homer, Alaska. Oliver’s mother, Mary Eunice Oliver, was active in the civil rights movement, and as a boy OIliver shook the hand of Martine Luther King Jr. He said he held the mirror because “We need to look at ourselves. What are we doing to make it better? How has it gotten to where it is. For Pete’s sake, this is horrible,” he said. “My brother was shot at by the KKK in Selma in 1964. Why are we still doing this?” (Photo by Michael Armstrong, Homer News)
  • David Blackmon, left, and Susan Cates-Blackmon take part in a demonstration against the events of Charlottesville, Va., and other white supremacist rallies and stand up against racism at WKFL Park in Homer on Sunday afternoon. About 50 people attended the one-hour event held from 3-4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017 in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong, Homer News)
  • People demonstrating against the events of Charlottesville, Va., and other white supremacist rallies stand up against racism at WKFL Park in Homer on Sunday afternoon. About 50 people attended the one-hour event held from 3-4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017 in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong, Homer News)

About 50 people attended a rally to stand up against racism at WKFL Park in Homer on Sunday afternoon.

The event was part of state and national demonstrations held in reaction to violent white supremacist rallies in Charlottesville, Va. in which a woman was run over by a car and killed, allegedly by a man with ties to white supremacist organizations.

People held signs that read “Don’t tolerate racism,” with an image of a person throwing a swastika in a trash can; “Outraged: Deport white terrorists,” and simply “Stand against racism.” Several people waved American flags.

Protester Charlotte Whiteley said she came “Because I want to be counted among the people who say yes to diversity.”

“When you rally around the flag, it’s the stars and stripes, not the stars and bars and the swastika,” said Brian Payne.

One demonstrator, Darrel Oliver, held a mirror because “We need to look at ourselves. What are we doing to make it better? How has it gotten to where it is? For Pete’s sake, this is horrible,” he said.

Protester Charlotte Whiteley said she came “Because I want to be counted among the people who say yes to diversity.”

Many people driving by honked horns and waved in support. One person driving a pickup truck with an American flag flying on a pole stopped and attempted to “roll coal” — spit out diesel exhaust fumes — but his attempt was more a burp than a blast. Otherwise, the protest was peaceful.

The short demonstration lasted from 3-4 p.m. and had been organized by Citizens AKtion Network.

“Thank you all for coming,” said CAN member Ron Keffer. “I think we made a point.”

Michael Armstrong can be reached at michael.armstrong@homernews.com.

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