Letters

Alaska needs income tax

As a 62 year old, lifelong Alaskan, I have rarely witnessed as much dysfunction in a legislative session as occurred in 2016. The inability of our elected representatives to craft a budget with even a glimpse of sustainability for the future was appalling. It made Vecogate pale in comparison.

 

Misused recall threatens process

I have worked with the Homer City Council, with city commissions, and with various city staff people over the last five years around practical challenges like Old Town and Pioneer Avenue revitalization, trails and sidewalks to schools. I believe every sitting council person, then and now, cares deeply about our community. Each represents a different Homer viewpoint. A council is designed to have different voices, and to be stronger as a result. They must work with each other, even when — especially when — viewpoints are different.

Good neighbors can disagree

We are neighbors. We might have different beliefs, interests, concerns, struggles, lifestyles. We might practice a different faith or none at all. We might be from a different social group, a different income bracket, a different age group, but we are neighbors. As your neighbor I will do my best to not let these differences affect my ability to listen, respect, tolerate, share and support you when and where I can. I will try to do this even in the most difficult times, because that is what good neighbors do.

Time out!

Mr. Lewis, Ms. Reynolds and Ms. Aderhold are wonderful people. They would help out anyone in a jam. This idea of a recall is just throwing salt on an open wound. These are troubled times. We are not united. But to attempt a petition for a recall is adding to the divide. Let’s talk it out. Agree to disagree, but let’s work together to continue our journey with peace in our hearts. Move forward Homer, because in the end, that is what we all really want.

 

Anger may be justified, recall isn’t

I’ve been trying to sort out the Sanctuary City/Council member Recall issues. Here’s my take: It’s clear that what we’re witnessing with these related issues is a very emotionally induced action and reaction, a venomous and radical swing between two mutually exclusive and antagonistic parties, the ultra-liberal element and its antitheses, fundamentalist conservatism.

Both parties propose, or have proposed, to use the machinery of government to restrict, if not downright suppress, the influence of the other.

No recall should take place

Being a city council person never has been easy. There are three factors that the newly elected often find challenging. First, the jobs are hard. A person has to read a great deal of difficult material before every meeting, and officials must work not only with those who agree but also with those who do not. The jobs take a great deal of time. Second, new officials often are dismayed to find how strictly their personal power is curtailed. A city council member has no authority on her own; only when the entire council passes a measure is any “power” expressed.

Council members deserve respect

I appreciate David Lewis, Catriona Reynolds and Donna Aderhold sponsoring the recent resolution that in my mind reflected what Homer represents — caring, compassion and respect for all. It simply restated what is already law as a reminder. Resolutions are not laws, they are opinions. Being able to have a resolution brought to the council is a free speech issue. Constituents sometimes write them, council members introduce them, and we the people debate them.

Founders backed church-state divide

After hours of testimony on the controversial invocation policy, Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly Member Stan Welles read a long, eloquent, moving and persuasive account of how, during a particularly acrimonious debate at the Constitutional Convention in 1787, Benjamin Franklin called for prayer. George Washington (who presided) and the other members of the convention then spent a long time in public prayer and the convention was saved and produced the Constitution, the foundation of our country and our body of laws.

Here’s what’s happening in Juneau

Since I don’t see much reporting about what is happening in Juneau, let me attempt to illuminate.

The muskrat coalition, let by Paul Seaton and Gabrielle LeDoux, is frittering away Alaska’s future. Currently, our annual budget is approximately $5.5 billion, and we are about $3.3 billion short in revenue. With no mind for the future, they are attempting to balance our over-bloated government, not by trimming the budget to match the current revenue, but rather through the wallets of every man, woman and child resident.

We are all in this together

I strongly disagree with the recall effort targeting Donna Aderhold, Catriona Reynolds and Dave Lewis. They are upstanding citizens in our “Cosmic Hamlet by the Sea.” We are very lucky to have one of the most balanced city councils at the moment — maybe ever. They represent both sides in these divisive times. I applaud all the Homer City Council members and thank them so much for their public service.

Even Garden of Eden had a snake

I was shocked, appalled and more than a little disturbed by Lynn Spence’s Point of View in the March 9 edition of the Homer News. I have long known that there is an insidious undercurrent of malice and ill will hiding deep beneath Homer’s beautiful and friendly face, but every time it breaks to the surface and shows its ugly face I am shocked and dismayed.

Travel ban hurting tourism

Heads up about an unintended consequence of the travel ban!

Our business is already seeing a decline in bookings because of the executive order creating a travel ban for certain peoples. We have lost spring business, which is very important to the success of our year, because travelers from Mexico and Canada were unsure about what to expect in the United States, and unwilling to put up with possible disruptions in their itineraries. They canceled their trips.

Time to thank council members

If you are asked to sign a petition to recall any one of our three city council members, I respectfully urge you to politely refuse. If you are considering circulating one of these petitions, please don’t. Instead, please do your part to put an end to this discouraging and pointless endeavor to shame three fellow citizens who have made a commitment to public service. To continue to encourage citizens to make the sacrifices necessary to run for local office, we must honor and appreciate those who do.

Recall effort no surprise

To say the very least, I was not at all shocked to hear there was a recall on three Homer City council members. After all, they tried to deceive the people of Homer with their, “We must all love one another” law.

Only a fool could not see it was only an attempt to turn Homer into a sanctuary city and invite as many illegal residents into our town, and spend all that money, that we don’t have, to give away to illegals.

Council should stick to city business

I have two things to comment on, both relating to Resolution 17-019.

First, I’m very concerned about the possible loss of three Homer City Council members: Donna Aderhold, David Lewis, and Catriona Reynolds, inasmuch as an attempt to have them recalled has been initiated. In my opinion all three are effective on the council, bringing carefully considered input, plus civilly responding to the input of others. To seek their recall on the basis of one issue seems short sighted.

Hurtful? Yes, indeed

A woman in opposition of the city council member recall of Aderhold, Lewis, and Reynolds, repeatedly told me that we did not understand the hurtful implications this recall would have in our community. “It’s just so hurtful,” she would say.

Help Hoxie Parks battle cancer

Hoxie Parks, 18, was recently diagnosed with Ewing’s Sarcoma, a rare bone cancer. In less than a week his life changed in many ways. He is an easygoing guy with a lot of friends, a member of the ski team, a hiker, and a boat skipper. He is patient with young kids and an amazing brother. He was set to graduate from Homer High School in May, go commercial fishing this summer and begin college in August to pursue an aviation degree. His plans are delayed until he recovers.

AP Food Pantry says thanks

The Anchor Point Food Pantry would like to send a hearty thank you to the Homer Community Food Pantry. If it weren’t for them, we would not be a pantry today. They have helped us through the years by sending out to Anchor Point a portion of their produce and grocery items every week (and assist with paying for the delivery). Recently they gave us a donation of $2,000, which was sorely needed. It is difficult for us being out in Anchor Point and away from the big stores and businesses. We appreciate your help.

A little respect would go a long way

I must say that I find Patrick Brown’s vehemence and “burn them at the stake” mentality disturbing. At their last meeting the Homer City Council members listened to the community testimony and voted down the ordinance he is referring to. If you don’t like an elected official’s politics, vote against them in the next election if they choose to run again, but to bully, threaten and personally attack them is not acceptable.

Want to make shift happen?

I sent my first correspondence off to the IRS (without a check).

It said “I’m not paying my taxes till my billionaire president pays his.”

Guess that makes me smart, too.

As far as protests go, it’s effective. Who cares how 51 percent of the people voted? When 2 percent don’t pay their tax, that’s when shift happens.

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Letters