Letters

TV show offers insight for Homer

I recently watched season 5 episode 22 of “Parks and Recreation” (a show on NBC, or Netflix) where — and I am not joking here — one of the main characters, the ever civic-minded Leslie Knope, is faced with her town (Pawnee) forming a committee to recall her from her public office because she refused to allow a chain restaurant (well-known to cause a large number of local health issues) to build in prime greenspace (which she later turned into a public park).

Let’s not fan flames of discord

As a long time small business owner in Homer, I am deeply concerned about the divisiveness created by the recall: a radical, unwarranted reaction with lasting repercussions. Additionally, I am frustrated with the recent newspaper ads which manufacture “evidence” of economic harm “caused” by our city council’s recent discussion about human rights. From my perch on the Homer Spit, my bookings and business have never been stronger, and I am hearing the same thing from many other small business owners in the community.

Recall effort part of the process

Hundreds of Homer residents signed recall petitions in March after three council members unwisely decided to declare Homer a Sanctuary City. The council members changed the wording of the resolution and tried to pass if off as an “inclusivity” document that promoted love and kindness while rejecting hate and intolerance. Their true intention leaned more toward promoting a nationwide “progressive” agenda that rejects and resists the Trump presidency.

Recall distress

I am deeply distressed by the current recall effort. The city council is a legislative body responsible for advocating for the health and well-being of the city as a whole. Part of this process is to propose and discuss resolutions and ordinances, including those brought to them by individual community members.

City council needs to consider what community needs to survive

I would like to relay my disappointment in the Homer City Council regarding their lack of support for the commercial fishing industry in recent years. I have expressed this very same discontent at Port and Harbor meetings in years past over harbor rate increases; however, I believe it may fall on deaf ears and is never relayed up the ladder.

Don’t rush state income tax

I’m a 60-year-old lifetime Alaskan and remember paying my state income tax.

An Income tax is the only way we can get a contribution from the workers that take 25 percent of oilfield money out of state while only buying a beer at the airport in Anchorage as a contribution to our state’s economy.

I was in favor of re-instating it until last week, when I discovered the “Bait and Switch.”

Prom was one enchanting evening

This year’s Homer High School “Enchanted Forest” prom on April 15 was a rousing success. Heartfelt thanks goes first to the group of students, led by Samantha Moonin and Mychaela Pitta, who worked so hard on all the details of organizing this major public event.

Council members should resign

Just a thought on the recent recall effort of the Homer City Council members that is now resulting in a special election. I have read both sides of the issue and wanted to chime in. It’s interesting that myself looking at the email chain and somebody on the differing side of the issue have such a wide divide. To me, it shows that there was a personal motive for this initially being brought up.

Income tax: bait and switch

Whether you are in favor of the state income tax or not, you should be aware of what appears to be a “bait and switch” by the elected proponents in state government.

They sold us a simple small percentage of fed tax bill, and delivered us a bill that is not fair to all Alaskans. They did not have the current proposal published during elections last fall.

I don’t like to be duped and deceived, and it is more upsetting that it comes from someone I respect and have supported in the past.

Citizens should act like good parents

My wife, Faith, and I created three children. As they grew, they occasionally objected to our parental authority. (Especially in their teenage years.) As good parents, we never allowed such behavior. They would fully understand we are the parents and they are the child. They were pulled back to their natural place, as children, listening to their parents.

We, the people of Alaska, created our government. The people are the parents and government is the child. Today, the government in Juneau has stood up and opposed our parental authority.

Students do learn through art

The staff and especially the K-2 students of Fireweed Academy would like to thank Bunnell Street Arts Center and the Alaska State Council on the Arts for continuing to fund the Artist in Schools program. Courtesy of this program, local ceramicist Jeff Szarzi spent a week at Little Fireweed, presenting an interactive “Myths and Legends in Clay” program with our younger students. The kids spent time interacting with Jeff and each other as they explored the ever changing world of clay, creating pinch pots and pendants and experiencing a Raku firing on the playground.

Kickin’ it for Hoxie

This past Wednesday a group of high school kids and a group of elementary kids got together to have fun practicing soccer skills, and to support a fellow teammate and neighbor, all “Kickin’ it for Hoxie.” (See photo on page 17.) Thanks to a flexible and willing crew, 92 elementary kids participated in the fundraiser for Hoxie Parks, and the mini-camp exemplified the best of what positive things our small town can do when called on to contribute. The event was hosted and supported by Homer Parks and Recreation and Homer High School.

Hoxie, family say thanks

We’d like to thank everyone in Homer for the support we have received since our son Hoxie was diagnosed with cancer just a few weeks ago. It’s not easy being away from home while he receives treatment in Seattle but hearing of all the wonderful activities and events you have all held for him keeps some smiles on our faces.

A distinctively successful event

The South Peninsula Haven House Board of Directors and staff would like to thank the community of Homer and surrounding area for your generosity in helping make our annual “Women of Distinction” event an overwhelming success. You truly opened up your hearts and generously parted with your hard-earned cash — through the gentle encouragement of Gary Thomas, our auctioneer extraordinaire.

Those in attendance helped us celebrate, and honor the contributions of Kelly Cooper, Lyn Maslow, Casey Marsh, and Donna and Bernie Gareau.

Mini grant available through Rotary

Homer Kachemak Bay Rotary Club invites you to apply for a mini grant that we are offering to a few local entities. These are for local projects that will benefit the community and or its children, and will range in amounts up to $1,000, depending on the scope of the project, value to the greater Homer area and availability of funds.

We are especially interested in projects where our members can also be involved.

Please email Milli Martin at millimom@xyz.net for application forms.

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