Letters

Science rules

More than 450 people came out on Earth Day and marched down Pioneer Avenue to celebrate all the ways that science makes our lives and the Homer community better. More than 600 marches happened around the world on April 22, but this March for Science was uniquely Homer.

Program helps cats find homes

A cat may have nine lives, but those lives can be pretty dreary if the animal is stuck in a kennel for weeks on end. After recently taking over management of the Homer Animal Shelter, we initiated a Spring is in the Air cat adoption special to provide incentive for would-be adopters.

ACLU takes on noble cause

I want to express my appreciation for the attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union Alaska who have taken up the cause of Homer City Council Members Catriona Reynolds, Donna Aderhold and David Lewis. Defending their right to freedom of speech is praiseworthy.

‘Wave of Peace’ touched heart

Kudos to all who contributed to make “The Wave of Peace” on Labyrinth International Day such a delightful sacred experience. So many details of planning converged, like water drops flowing together to create a deep pool of sacred thoughts, songs, music, and experiences, that culminated in a meditative walk in the labyrinth at the Homer Episcopal Church.

Great music for an even better cause

Bill and Dorothy Fry of Bear Creek Winery have consistently been one of the community’s staunchest supporters. Whenever, wherever there is a benefit or a fundraiser of any kind, you can always find a generous donation in the name of Bear Creek Winery.

They have recently completed a gorgeous and intimate amphitheater at the winery, and are debuting it for a cause that is nearest and dearest to their hearts: a benefit for a scholarship fund in memory of their beautiful daughter Nikki.

Gift helps student explore

On April 20 and 21, students and staff at Homer Flex traveled to Seward. This field trip, which focused on nature and post-secondary education, allowed students to experience the Alaska SeaLife Center and Exit Glacier, as well as tour and learn about AVTEC.

At the Sealife Center, we explored the ocean’s influence on our daily lives and learned about local marine life. We even learned about cephalopods through a squid dissection. The opportunity to interact with and explore local marine animals was amazing.

Something for HEA board to study

In an earlier commentary I mentioned having studied and analyzed HEA rate structures. (RE: Homer News, March 9, 2017 – Point of View.) However, despite my expressed wishes and firm intent to put it to rest, the analysis churned on to its own logical end, whereupon it spit out a new conclusion/solution.

All Residential Customers Energy charge = 25.875 cents per kilowatt hour. This is what is called a blended rate, in this case a three-way blend.

Energy charge = 14.866 cents per kilowatt hour

COPA = 7.373 cents per kilowatt hour

On the Wing flies — thanks to many

Now, after 13 “On the Wing” productions, my good intent to write a letter of appreciation is finally manifesting. So to all of you ever involved in “winging it” with me, thank you for all those years. And to the 2017 crew — how could one find better people, such beautiful, sincere, giving and talented people?

Nancy Levinson, I wish you would teach oratorical skills. Jeanne Steele,your heart is so huge. Milli Martin, you wow me once again. And Skywalker! — what love and class you pour into your storytelling art.

TV show offers insight for Homer

I recently watched season 5 episode 22 of “Parks and Recreation” (a show on NBC, or Netflix) where — and I am not joking here — one of the main characters, the ever civic-minded Leslie Knope, is faced with her town (Pawnee) forming a committee to recall her from her public office because she refused to allow a chain restaurant (well-known to cause a large number of local health issues) to build in prime greenspace (which she later turned into a public park).

Let’s not fan flames of discord

As a long time small business owner in Homer, I am deeply concerned about the divisiveness created by the recall: a radical, unwarranted reaction with lasting repercussions. Additionally, I am frustrated with the recent newspaper ads which manufacture “evidence” of economic harm “caused” by our city council’s recent discussion about human rights. From my perch on the Homer Spit, my bookings and business have never been stronger, and I am hearing the same thing from many other small business owners in the community.

Recall effort part of the process

Hundreds of Homer residents signed recall petitions in March after three council members unwisely decided to declare Homer a Sanctuary City. The council members changed the wording of the resolution and tried to pass if off as an “inclusivity” document that promoted love and kindness while rejecting hate and intolerance. Their true intention leaned more toward promoting a nationwide “progressive” agenda that rejects and resists the Trump presidency.

Recall distress

I am deeply distressed by the current recall effort. The city council is a legislative body responsible for advocating for the health and well-being of the city as a whole. Part of this process is to propose and discuss resolutions and ordinances, including those brought to them by individual community members.

City council needs to consider what community needs to survive

I would like to relay my disappointment in the Homer City Council regarding their lack of support for the commercial fishing industry in recent years. I have expressed this very same discontent at Port and Harbor meetings in years past over harbor rate increases; however, I believe it may fall on deaf ears and is never relayed up the ladder.

Don’t rush state income tax

I’m a 60-year-old lifetime Alaskan and remember paying my state income tax.

An Income tax is the only way we can get a contribution from the workers that take 25 percent of oilfield money out of state while only buying a beer at the airport in Anchorage as a contribution to our state’s economy.

I was in favor of re-instating it until last week, when I discovered the “Bait and Switch.”

Prom was one enchanting evening

This year’s Homer High School “Enchanted Forest” prom on April 15 was a rousing success. Heartfelt thanks goes first to the group of students, led by Samantha Moonin and Mychaela Pitta, who worked so hard on all the details of organizing this major public event.

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