Letters

Want to make shift happen?

I sent my first correspondence off to the IRS (without a check).

It said “I’m not paying my taxes till my billionaire president pays his.”

Guess that makes me smart, too.

As far as protests go, it’s effective. Who cares how 51 percent of the people voted? When 2 percent don’t pay their tax, that’s when shift happens.

 

Homer above this divisiveness

It’s with a heavy heart I find myself again prompted to speak out and be the voice of many in this community. I’m not a political activist; I’m your every day Homer citizen. Over the last 20 years, I have made your sandwiches at Subway, helped you find hangars at Ulmer’s, checked you in at the airport and marshaled in your aircraft when you returned, bagged your groceries at Safeway, and now I happily prepare your delicious popcorn and greet you with a smile when you come to be entertained at the Homer Theater.

Hospice thanks Masonic Club

Hospice of Homer would like to thank the Kachemak Bay Masonic Club, in cooperation with Homer Elks No. 2127, for the recent donation. The funds were raised at the 2nd Annual Masonic Awareness Spaghetti Feed Fundraiser on Jan. 28. Hospice is thankful to the Masonic Club for their generous support. This is the second year Hospice of Homer was chosen to be a recipient of this event.

It takes a village to raise readers

Once again Homer Homemakers FCE thanks American Legion General Buchner Post No. 16 for its generous donation in support of the club’s Raise-a- Reader® literacy project. At a January meeting, members assembled 85 packets. The parents of each baby born at South Peninsula Hospital or the Homer Birthing and Wellness Center is to receive a packet.

Free speech critical to democracy

I want to thank the Homer City Council for providing an opportunity for people to voice their views. I know it is not always easy for any of us to hear views that differ from our own, but free speech is a critical part of any democracy.

As many who testified at the last meeting stated, we love our town and believe in caring about one another. I am very glad this is a value that binds us, regardless of our other views.

Resolution hurt Homer

I am receiving feedback from several segments of tourism and especially business endeavors with regards to the consideration for Homer to become a sanctuary city. I am thankful the real members of the Homer City Council stood firm on our Constitution but there is now significant blowback.

Due to the cloud created by the confusion of the sponsors of the resolution, the name and goodwill of our city is at a loss and the losses include tourism which our economy relies on greatly. It will take time to recover the momentum destroyed by this effort.

We all want what’s best for Homer

I’ve tried and tried to write this letter and I keep getting out in the weeds, so this time I’m just going to say it. Yes, the first draft of resolution 17/019 was divisive. It was penned by one person who assumed that version would never see the light of day. But if anyone thinks there aren’t plenty of people in Homer who are that opposed to the Trump administration, they need to get their head out of the sand.

Time to stop invocations

On March 21, the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly will vote on an ordinance to delete invocations at its meetings. Some people see this as a war on religion. Not at all. Doing away with prayer at government functions in no way interferes with people’s right to pray at home, in their churches, out loud on radio and TV or silently all day long.

In fact, the Establishment Clause of the United States Constitution protects free exercise of religion. But it also prevents secular government from becoming a theocracy.

Responding to Reps. Seaton, Foster

When did the State of Alaska start issuing clean air and water? I can walk outside and take in as much as I like. Our representatives however, feel like it’s either pony up for more taxes and they take the PFD or I no longer can breathe clean air. They list the many government services that they expect I want government to provide and add on adjectives like: strong, reasonable, reliable, well maintained, affordable, well managed and fair.

Bureaucracy not the answer

Is good old-fashioned Christian charity dead in Homer?

What if you give a meeting to facilitate charity for the temporary homeless and no one shows? Well, almost no one.

At the last city council meeting, council member Shelly Erickson’s proposal (memo 17-017) that the city approve as an allowable use temporary housing for the homeless, to be provided by local churches, got immediately pitchforked into the Planning Commission wagon as it lumbered by.

Invocations should continue

I am writing to express my strong opposition to Ordinance 2017-02, “An Ordinance Amending KPB 22.40.080 and repealing KPB 22.40.090, which Provide for an Invocation During Assembly Meetings.”

I am not a particularly religious person, but I am an American to my very core. Religious beliefs and our Judeo-Christian values are essential elements of our country. Efforts by secular members of our society to eliminate any reference to God or religion from activities of our government are wrong and should not be condoned or encouraged.

Emblem Club supports GED

Imagine: you were unable to complete high school, so getting a job is difficult. But you have studied and you are now ready to pass the GED high school equivalency exam, which will open doors to jobs, vocational training and college. How exciting! But there is another barrier: you can’t afford the $120 national testing fee.

HoWL suspends 2017 programs, but looks forward to future

Dear Homer Community and HoWL supporters,

HoWL (Homer Wilderness Leaders) has been empowering young leaders through outdoor education since 2009. By leading hundreds of kids on wilderness expeditions to learn leadership, stewardship and survival skills, HoWL has challenged our youth to engage with the environment, build a healthy peer community and explore this amazing place we call home, Kachemak Bay.

City’s grants program helps nonprofits keep doors open

The Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies (CACS) would like to thank the City of Homer Grants Program administered through the Homer Foundation for the operational grant of unrestricted funds that we received this past year and for their support of the nonprofits in Homer.

Most nonprofit organizations struggle to raise operational funds as many grantors prefer to fund projects and materials, and any operational funds that are received are extremely important to the administrative and overall functions of a nonprofit organization.

Community came together to create march

On behalf of the Women’s March on Homer, we would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to all the women, men and children who made this march a peaceful, nonpartisan event. Six weeks ago, when we began organizing, our goal was 100 participants. On Sautuday, Jan. 21, we were astounded with an estimated 1,000 people who came to make their voices heard that women’s rights are human rights. Our march was truly an inclusive one, reflecting the diversity of our community. We all came together to speak loudly for liberty and justice for all.

Awesome Foundation truly awesome

We’d like to give our highest gratitude to the Alaska Chapter of the Awesome Foundation for supporting Homer’s own Youth On Record Alaska (YORAK) program with a $1,000 check last week to buy two new laptops which puts the best equipment out there in the hands of teens. The application was so user-friendly and the quick turn-around was impressive. We’re so happy to be selected as a program which others believe in as much as we do.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Letters