Local News

Correction

In the May 18 Arts story “Two new memoirs raise the bar for Alaska writing,” the name of Ralph Galeano’s boat and the title of his book got mixed up. His book is “Alaska Challenge” and his former boat is “American Eagle.” The website for his book also was omitted. It is www.horsemanspress.com.

Mysterious flier hits mail boxes

“Homer residents, you’ve been served!” reads a flier that appeared in Homer mailboxes this week. “We the People will not be silenced.” The flier references a lawsuit filed by Homer City Council members Donna Aderhold, David Lewis and Catriona Reynolds seeking to halt the June 13 recall election targeting the three council members.

National Poppy Day is May 26

As part of Memorial Day weekend events, May 26 has been designated National Poppy Day. The American Legion encourages all patriotic Americans to wear or display a poppy as a symbol of remembrance and hope. The American Legion Post 16 family, led by the American Legion Auxiliary, distributes poppies by placing donation cans at local businesses. Members also will be distributing poppies from 10 a.m.-6 p.m May 26 and 27 at Safeway.

DNR, ADF&G hold net pen meeting

Natural Resources Commissioner Andy Mack and Fish and Game Commissioner Sam Cotten hold a public listening session Monday on net pen aquaculture development in Tutka Bay. The meeting is from 6-8 p.m. May 15 at the Alaska Islands and Ocean Visitor Center. The meeting also includes an update on the planning process underway for the Kachemak Bay State Park and State Wilderness Park. For additional details, contact Mary Kay Ryckman at marykay.ryckman@alaska.gov or 907-269-8426.

New judge assigned in recall suit

Despite an expedited court schedule in a lawsuit by three Homer City Council members seeking to stop a June 13 recall election, public notice of the election will proceed. The city has to issue a notice 30 days in advance, or by May 18. It also has to print election ballots soon. The deadline to register to vote in that election is May 14.

5.2 quake hits Kenai Peninsula

A 5.4 earthquake that first seemed like a sudden gust of wind struck the Kenai Peninsula at 8:25 p.m. Saturday night. The quake quickly accelerated, rattling wood frame houses and causing some objects to fall off shelves. The quake hit at a depth of 40 miles in Cook Inlet about 10 miles north of Ninilchik and 39 miles north of Homer. According to “did you feel it?” reports to the U.S. Geological Survey, people described the earthquake as having light shaking with no damage.

Shorebirds visit right on time

As if turning a switch, thousands of shorebirds arrived May 3, pushed north and west by a storm with winds up to 35 mph. Predictions that the peak of the migration would hit right during the 25th annual Kachemak Bay Shorebird Festival May 4-7 proved spot on, justifying a decision to move the festival up a week this year.

Tustumena return delayed until July 18

Rusted or pitted steel discovered during the M/V Tustumena’s overhaul will mean another delay in the 53-year-old state ferry’s return to service — this time to 5 p.m. July 18, when the Tustumena returns to Homer. Now undergoing work at the Vigor Ketchikan shipyard, workers discovered the rusted or pitted steel, called steel wastage, in the engine room. The ferry went in for its overhaul on March 13.

Homer gives huge welcome to USS Hopper

Fifty flags on the Homer Spit beach and perhaps 500 people greeted USS Hopper, the Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, based U.S. Navy destroyer, as it rounded Coal Point at the end of the Spit on Saturday. Homer Downtown Rotary provided U.S. Flags, and rows of them lined the beach in front of Land’s End Resort. As Hopper pulled past the Spit, rows of sailors lined the decks. One family, Ralph Crane, his daughter Joy Overson and his granddaughter Faith Overson, waved a large American flag and an Alaska flag.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Local News