Farmers’ Market

Market coin worth $20, good at 50+ vendors

The Homer Farmers’ Market is a world unto itself. If you were to go back in time to the central square of the medieval village, this is what you would find: a bustling market.

This little village should have a shield or a crest, right? You can see the market symbol the minute you walk up to the info booth at the entrance. Designed by Scott Miller from the Wood Diamonds booth, this emblem is on the new Alaska Grown T-shirts.

This crest is not new. Many of you may recognize it from the market coin. Yes, like any good kingdom, the farmers’ market has its own currency. 

This doesn’t mean that you can’t spend cash at the market, but if plastic is all you have, then you can swipe your debit card at the front info booth and get the coins to spend.

This coin is no joke. One side has the market crest, the other a scene from the Land of the Midnight Sun.   Minted at the Alaska Mint, this golden coin sits heavy in your hand and feels like it has some serious bartering power.  

And it does.

Worth $20, the coin is as good as cash for the 50 or more different vendors at the market.  

More than 50 vendors? Yes, that’s more vendors than are on the stretch of Pioneer Avenue from Main Street to the stop light. 

The dynamic economy of this village market is not to be underestimated. 

Where else can you stop at one place and have lunch, buy household necessities, get the ingredients for the freshest and best meals, buy gifts and treasures for yourself or someone else, listen to music, let the kids play while doing crafts and games in the Kids Zone, and see everyone you ever met in town?

The Homer Farmers’ Market is the perfect village square indeed.  And now that it is open on Wednesdays as well, you can visit it twice a week.  

So head over to Ocean Drive on Saturdays from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and Wednesdays from 3-6 p.m. to see what a resilient community looks like.

Kyra Wagner is the director of Sustainable Homer and the Homer Farmers’ Market’s biggest fan.

 

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