Fishing Report

Good ol’ days back at Fishing Hole

If you haven’t visited The Fishing Hole lately, there’s only one way to describe it. It’s a “Back to the Future” scenario with silvers performing Cirque du Soleil flips over each other while rabid fishermen throw everything at them from plug-cut herring to Pixies the size of 1200cc Harleys.

After a few years of dismal returns, it’s starting to look like the good old days may be beginning to roll again.

Good ol’ days back at Fishing Hole

If you haven’t visited The Fishing Hole lately, there’s only one way to describe it. It’s a “Back to the Future” scenario with silvers performing Cirque du Soleil flips over each other while rabid fishermen throw everything at them from plug-cut herring to Pixies the size of 1200cc Harleys.

After a few years of dismal returns, it’s starting to look like the good old days may be beginning to roll again.

If you can’t catch anything, imitate success

Now that the silvers are starting to enter the Nick Dudiak Fishing Lagoon, it’s time for some of you to pause and try to figure out why you missed more strikes than a blindfolded drunk at a piñata party when the chinooks were kings of The Hole.
Let’s take a look at the clueless bobber fisherman who stands around bewildered as anglers next to him are getting take-downs while his float sees less action than a channel buoy in a duck pond.

Fishing Hole could use a little help

Over the weekend, I took notice of a superfluity of rather unseemly comments concerning the conditions at the cleaning tables adjacent to the Homer Spit’s fishing lagoon.  

While trying to fillet their catches, anglers were under siege by a squadron of sky rats with the manners of turkey buzzards jazzed after power wolfing a commercial tanker of Red Bull. 

Small gift may help someone catch fish

As I wander around during the week shooting the breeze with shore anglers, I’m amazed to find that many aren’t carrying a tide book either on them or in their rig.

There is a plethora of information squeezed into those little booklets covering everything from how to tie fishing knots to how to outsmart a razor clam — although I would suggest that you never admit that you had to look up the latter.

Fillet tips so you can look like a pro

Let’s get real here. There are some of you who flay at fish rather than fillet them. It is astounding to watch seriously filleting impaired fishermen turn beautiful salmon sides into something resembling the aftermath of being jammed through a nuclear powered juicer.

Believe me, I’m not close to being an expert, but my efforts do not result in what looks like a pile of exploded salmon dip either. 

So, once again, as a public service, the following guidelines are humbly submitted for your consideration.

Ignoring fishing regs won’t pay in long run

I just don’t get it. For weeks, information has been bouncing around the Internet and printed media that, for right now, fishermen and fisherettes may only use one unbaited, single-hook, artificial lure on the Anchor River, Deep Creek and Ninilchik River. 

Pretty straight forward right? Well not so fast. A quick scan of the Wildlife Trooper records and you’ll find that there are still people out there with the intellectual capacity of asphalt.

Before you go fishing, give yourself refresher course on regulations

Well, now, wasn’t that a beautiful Memorial Day weekend for those of you who can dimly recall it? The weather was so nice and semi smoke free that campgrounds with the burn bans were glowing with Phase Five sunburns that served as stand-in grills for the carnivorous crowd.
The Spit resembled an Indie 500 parking lot in some areas and the boat launch was sometimes so busy you couldn’t launch a float coat without slavering it with butter.
There wasn’t a lack of fishing yarns either.

As part of research, ADF&G wants to talk to anglers

The time has come for the commencement of this year’s fish runs which coolly coincides with the roll out of Reeling ’Em In for 2014.

Once again we will be bringing you what lure soakers and draggers are scoring with in the open waters along with hints as to where to find and hopefully hook up with your prey of the day. 

But first, there are some significant changes in the fishing regs this year. 

Diehard anglers don’t duck for cover

Labor Day decided to be a bit testy this year. Winds pounded the wilting fireweed generating mini blizzards of white seedling parachutes spinning through the air in search of new beginnings while whitecap seas prematurely ended fishing for many of the small boat crowd.

I’m not trying to imply that things were a bit dull over the weekend but when I start noticing fireweed seed formations instead of what’s flying around off the end of sportsmen’s casting lines, there’s been a significant pause in the action.

Summer is slipping into fall, but there’s still lots of good fishing

While I was embattled with an obnoxious woodpecker that was practicing wicked marimba beats on our logs this morning, a huge flock of cranes soared over the cabin and seemed to cheer the little *&&^%$ on. 

 I didn’t think much about it until after the pile-driving beak with feathers suddenly decided to jet toward Malibu when he spotted what looked to be an enraged Sasquatch wielding a Wiffle bat heading his way snarling epithets that would embarrass a Navy Seal instructor.   

Fishing for silvers has turned golden

Thar whar bright treasures in them thar high tides near the base of the Spit’s east side over the weekend. Even a half stoned pirate with dual eye patches could have sensed the glistening jewels cruising beneath the bay’s calm surface because the coho were hot popping and splashing along the shoreline as other small schools circled up to a couple of hundred yards off the beach. 

For awhile, there was more silver being displayed out there than a Goth piercing convention in L.A. featuring Dennis Rodman’s lips. 

Still time to put fish in freezer (or canner or smoker or soup pot or...)

As August starts to slowly glissade (“butt scoot” for those of you who consider outdoor recreation as playing “Big Fish” on an iPad) itself down the slippery slope toward fall, there’s still time to add to your stash of smoked, canned, frozen, fermented, pickled, honey cured and super secretly preserved fish that only you and your acutely deranged cat can stomach.   

It’s true that the weather can get pretty nasty this time of year, but don’t forget, good fishermen know how, when and where to go after their prey. 

Activity picking up around The Fishing Hole

Lately there have been growing rumors about silvers lurking outside The Fishing Hole. 

Until noon Monday I thought those tales were being generated by fishermen walking too close to some of the campsites in the area that have more smoke pouring out of bongs than their campfires.

I scouted the lagoon area around high tide for jumpers but it was deader than a porcupine Frisbee on the Sterling Highway until an angler arrived to hit the outgoing tide.  

Halibut dining on herring, squid

This summer the “Reeling ‘Em In” gmail inbox has been busier than a confessional booth on the day after Mardi Gras. 

There have been questions about fishing techniques, how to tell the difference between certain species and when and where to fish. We even had a request for directions to a great burger joint because they were down here for the scenery and preferred landing their fillets in a supermarket where they wouldn’t get fish scales on their Birkenstocks. 

Fishing Hole action slow; halibut heats up

Anyone cruising by the Fishing Hole recently must be thinking they would come across more people if they dropped in on a private Pebble mine, executives only, appreciation party for the Alaska Wilderness League. What can I say? It has been so slow that you can find more action sitting at home watching dandelions convert your lawn into the mother of all puffballs.

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