Elections

Arnold: Let’s get city back to basics

First of all, thank you for voting. I’m running for city council because I’d like to see the city of Homer move away from the unnecessary spending and overbearing ordinances that do little or nothing for the citizens of Homer. My goal is to eliminate wasteful spending in our city government and get back to the basics; affordable water and sewer, well maintained roads and emergency services without saddling the citizens with ever increasing taxes.

Lewis: Homer needs young families

Homer has many things going for it. We have great beauty, a good port and harbor, many recreational opportunities, excellent schools and an eclectic population that brings diversity to the city. We have just finished the gas line that will help lower the cost of living. The trail system in town is growing yearly and is making Homer a walking and biking friendly city. We have a harbor that is growing and improving and has a chance to be one of the economic engines helping the city to prosper.

Lowe: Balanced budget key to city’s success

Determining the city budget will be one of the priorities to focus on this fall. Ultimately all city council considerations are centered in fiscal responsibility. A balanced budget with prudent utilization of city funds is the backbone of our success.
Hand-in-hand with developing a budget will be recruiting a new city manager and developing a transition plan in order to lessen the impacts of Walt Wrede’s departure at the end of December.

Lowe: Sees role as representing everyone

A founding member of the Homer Cycling Club, Catriona Lowe has a gimmick not seen in previous Homer elections: She rides her bicycle around town with a campaign sign on the back.
Lowe, 47, decided to run for Homer City Council a few days before a recent life change. On Aug. 9, she married Derek Reynolds, a fellow cycling club member and biking enthusiast and owner of Cycle Logical, a bike sales and service shop on Kachemak Drive. From a previous marriage, Lowe has two teenage sons, Ian and Dexter.

Lewis: Wants support for nonprofits, trails

In his three campaigns for Homer City Council, incumbent and two-term council member David Lewis has seen the field grow progressively larger. He first ran for office in 2008, a two-person field with council member Barbara Howard.
“I wouldn’t say I ran. I walked,” Lewis said.
In 2011, he and Howard were joined by former council member Mike Heimbuch, both of them the winners. This time, Howard has retired, and Lewis is the sole incumbent in a four-person field.

Arnold: Would take hard look at budget

In the 2013 city election, city council candidate Justin Arnold emerged 1-1 in his campaign. While he lost for council, finishing fourth in a field of four, a petition he organized to repeal a single-use plastic bag ban won 661 to 518 votes.
Arnold also called for a recount when third-place candidate Corbin Arno seemed to have won on election day, but fell behind 10 votes to incumbent council member Bryan Zak after absentee and other votes were counted. With Arno, Arnold again is taking a second try at the city council.

Arno: Council still ‘business unfriendly’

In the 2013 Homer City Council election, lifelong Homer resident Corbin Arno had a moment of glory on election night, seeming to have won by four votes over incumbent Bryan Zak.
After absentee ballots were counted and a recount held, Zak pulled ahead by a squeaker, a 10-vote margin.
Arno again is running for council.
“I’m still concerned about some of the things going on in the city,” Arno said of why he’s running again. “No matter what the council says, they’re still business unfriendly.”

Mike Navarre: Education our top responsibility

I have been honored to serve as Kenai Peninsula Borough mayor for the last three years.  I have received a great deal of support and encouragement since I announced my plans to seek re-election and greatly appreciate all of the support — thank you.
These past three years as mayor have gone by quickly and, for the most part, very smoothly. I’ve approached the job and responsibilities as I outlined during the 2011 campaign with strong administrative oversight, responsible budget and financial management, and an open door policy.  

Wythe wants to keep project momentum going

Note: In Homer’s two-person mayoral race, citizens might have noticed something missing from the contest between incumbent Mayor Beth Wythe and challenger Lindianne Sarno: yard signs. By mutual agreement, Wythe and Sarno decided not to put up the signs. The candidates top the Oct. 7 Homer ballot, with elections also for two city council members, a charter commission question and seven commission members.

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Martin: Preparing for disasters his goal

Letting the experience of the past frame his vision for the future, Carrol Martin’s reasons to be elected as the Kenai Peninsula Borough’s next mayor are to prepare peninsula residents for the next disaster.

“I think of the disasters that we need to plan to avoid,” said Martin. “One is that we will have another earthquake one day and it’s probably going to be sooner than we think.”

Bearup: Listening tops his priority list

With a background that includes serving as mayor and law enforcement officer for the city of Soldotna, being pastor of a church and accumulating day-to-day lessons of life in general, Kenai Peninsula Borough mayor candidate Tom Bearup believes he has acquired “a lot of quality things over the years that will be attributes for a borough mayor.”

Bearup’s vision of being mayor includes developing a “team of quality people” that would complement the directors and managers already in place in the borough. 

Animal control, voting by mail among issues on Oct. 7 ballot

Two propositions on the Oct. 7 regular election ballot will gauge local opinion on two Kenai Peninsula Borough issues.

Proposition A asks voters who live outside of cities to consider whether the borough should exercise limited animal control powers and if it should charge a property tax to pay for those services. Proposition B asks all borough voters if elections should be held by mail.

Cooper: Wants Homer to be heard on assembly

A candidate for the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly District 8-Homer, Kelly Cooper isn’t waiting until she’s elected to find out what’s going on in the borough. She’s already doing some homework.

“When I got on the (South Peninsula) hospital board, I did that, too,” said Cooper, a SPH operating board member since 2008. “I went to some meetings before I decided to accept the board position so I could see what I was getting into, so I could come in a little prepared and up to speed, understanding how they operate. It’s invaluable.” 

Council members sworn in

After certifying the results of the Oct. 1, election, the Homer City Council swore in two council members at its regular meeting Monday.

Raising his right hand, first-time city council member Gus VanDyke swore to “impartially perform all duties of the office which I am about to enter, according to law, and therein do equal right and justice to all, so help me God.” Returning council member Bryan Zak also took the oath of office.

Zak pulls ahead to win re-election

In a squeaker of an election, incumbent Homer City Council member Bryan Zak made up a four-vote deficit in unofficial election day results to win re-election to a third term. 

After the city elections canvass board tallied absentee and other votes last Friday, and after a recount on Tuesday, Zak won with 546 votes over Corbin Arno’s 536 votes — a 10-vote lead.

VanDyke wins council seat; other race too close too call

Homer businessman Gus VanDyke leads the Homer City Council election with 544 votes. One of two candidates endorsed by Homer Voice for Business, the other endorsed candidate, Corbin Arno, is in a tight race for a second seat against incumbent council member Bryan Zak. Arno is just four votes ahead, with 461 votes to Zak’s 457. 

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