MICHAEL ARMSTRONG

KPB Mayoral candidates debate

In a Kenai Peninsula Borough mayoral candidate forum sponsored by the Homer Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center, Dale Bagley, Linda Farnsworth Hutchings and Charlie Pierce all distinguished themselves as capable candidates for the borough’s top administrative position.

Firefighters knock down small wildfire

A small wildland fire in the hills above Shirley Court appears to have been started by some sort of accelerant, Homer Volunteer Fire Department Chief Bob Painter said on Wednesday. HVFD firefighters responded and put out a wildland fire behind Homer High School that started about 11:30 a.m. Monday morning, Sept. 18. The fire was near the cross-country running trails but did not threaten the high school.

Police investigating minor shooting incident

Homer Police are investigating a shooting incident in which a man suffered a minor gunshot wound. According to police reports, at 6:20 a.m. Sept. 17, police responded to a report of a gunshot wound at a Pioneer Avenue address. No one was transported to the hospital. Two men were handling a handgun they thought was unloaded when it went off, said Homer Police Chief Mark Robl.

Seven run for two seats on council

In the Oct. 3 municipal election, Kenai Peninsula Borough residents will elect a new borough mayor and vote on school board and assembly members. Residents in the unincorporated areas of the city also will consider a ban on commercial cannabis with Proposition 1, where a “yes” vote approves the ban (see story, page 1, Business &Real Estate).

Vance brings recall role to council race

If the elephant in the room in the Homer City Council race is the recall campaign, candidate Sarah Vance could be considered the elephant trainer. She served as one of the co-chairs of Heartbeat of Homer, the group organized to back the attempted recall against council members Donna Aderhold, David Lewis and Catriona Reynolds, and became the spokesperson for the recall group.

Rachel Lord: Expanding options for new families

If elected to the Homer City Council, candidate Rachel Lord would be the youngest member of a council that has commonly tilted toward people in their 50s and 60s. Along with fellow candidate Sarah Vance, 38, she represents a generation of Homer residents often lost in political discussions — 30-something people struggling to raise families and build careers in a town with a high cost of living and limited job opportunities.

Pinks run in places never seen before in bay

All around Kachemak Bay the past weeks, people have reported large runs of pink salmon in places never seen before — at least in significant numbers. Last week at Beluga Slough, pink salmon ran all the way up into the slough and in a drainage ditch leading to the city’s stormwater drainage system. At Mariner Park on the Homer Spit last Friday, children from Little Fireweed Academy working on the Burning Basket ran up a small creek leading into the slough and yelled “Salmon! Salmon!” at pinks passing by.

ADOT&PF reminds Alaskans of laws guiding campaign signs

With campaigning for elections underway in Alaska, the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (ADOT&PF) last week sent out a press release reminding Alaskans that the use of public right of ways for political advertising is prohibited. Advertising in right of ways or visible and legible from state right of ways are prohibited.

Homer helps hurricane victims

As south Texas recovers from the devastation last month from Hurricane Harvey, several lower Kenai Peninsula men have started relief efforts in the Houston area. Former Anchor Point resident Chase McKinney, now living in Sugar Land, Texas, this week shifted his work from rescuing people stranded in flooded areas of Houston to getting supplies to people in shelters.

Burning Basket is Sunday

The 14th annual Homer Burning Basket project of community interactive, impermanent art, is presented to Homer this coming Sunday afternoon at the build site at Mariner Park on the Homer Spit. Construction continues today through Saturday, and volunteers are invited to help finish the basket or provide nightly security.

New school bus system faces hiccups on first week

Reading social media last week after the start of the Kenai Peninsula Borough school year, a reader might have thought kids got transported to school in the back of a Ford Model A pickup truck — which, yes, was how the lucky children of the Homer Heights School actually did get to class in 1940. Parents complained about young children getting on the wrong buses, transportation taking two hours to get home, and late pick ups and drop offs.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - MICHAEL ARMSTRONG