Gordy vernon

What about carbon footprint?

The U.S. military is the largest consumer of fuel on the planet. When the Navy steams up to play, its four ships (two destroyers, two replenishment ships) will burn more fossil fuel in the three weeks of war games than Seattle City Light burns in half a year. Seattle City Light provides electricity to houses, offices and stores for 800,000 customers. This comparison doesn’t include the Air Force, Army or Coast Guard.

Where does this carbon footprint lead? Military intelligence is wading in to rising sea temperatures, dead fish, deaf sea mammals and birds.

Want to make shift happen?

I sent my first correspondence off to the IRS (without a check).

It said “I’m not paying my taxes till my billionaire president pays his.”

Guess that makes me smart, too.

As far as protests go, it’s effective. Who cares how 51 percent of the people voted? When 2 percent don’t pay their tax, that’s when shift happens.

 

Do the math: SB 21 isn’t good for Alaskans

I taught math. I wasn’t good in math, but you want a teacher for whom math isn’t obvious. The textbook helped kids identify what they didn’t know. Then they asked other kids. They got points for asking, but big points for explanations. If they asked me, I’d explain ways I’d seen work for dozens of kids. Sometimes I’d get that look, that they didn’t understand how numbers worked.  After this last election, let’s try the math again.  

Kudos to Conoco; let trickle begin

 

In a day and age of corporate men, I am Conocoman.

I confess, even with leftist leanings and environmental sensibilities, I own Conoco stock. A friend that works on the Slope says my car leaks more oil than Conoco’s Alaska operations. So I’m proud to be part of a company who takes corporate responsibility to heart and to their bottom line.

But let’s focus on that bottom line. ConocoPhillips profits under ACES in Alaska were:

2009:  $1.5 billion

Which oil tax would you pick?

Just cause the guy’s a greasy thug and you’re scared doesn’t mean you’ve got to grab the tab. You bet Alaska is a tough place to drill for oil — hundreds of miles from a road, with temperatures that turn oil into sludge, where crews are remote and cold.

But if you’re an oil executive you pick the politics, you choose the infrastructure, you pick your battles with the insurgencies, you choose your chance of hitting oil, you pick what you pay in royalties.  Go ahead pick:

Taxes less than Alaska
(46% includes federal and state royalties)

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