Cristy Fry

Bad weather keeping halibut boats tied to dock

Ten days into the 2015 halibut season, prices are beginning to fall slightly, but production is nearly nonexistent, at least in the central Gulf of Alaska, Area 3A.

Stormy weather and big tides have conspired to make a slow start to the season in Area 3A, with the weather continuing to keep boats in port this week.

Boats in the area delivered only 146,000 pounds from 26 deliveries during the first 10 days, although deliveries in Southeast Alaska, Area 2C, topped out at 420,000 pounds from 62 deliveries.

Bumper crop of pinks expected

Thanks to hatcheries coming back online, lower Cook Inlet is expecting a bumper crop of pink salmon this season.

Fishermen can expect a total run of 2.16 million pinks and a harvest of 1.72 million fish, compared to the latest five-year average harvest of 650,000 fish.

Questions raised about experimental fishery

The experimental fishery to determine the feasibility of a seine fishery for pollock in state waters has finished up with mixed results.

The Gulf of Alaska pollock workgroup held its final meeting last month to discuss adding a limited entry state pollock fishery to Alaska waters for both trawl and non-trawl vessels and go over the results of the experimental fishery.

Trawl fleet continuing to fish for Pacific cod

The boats fishing for Pacific cod with pots in the central Gulf of Alaska federal season finally wrapped up their 17.9 million pound quota Monday, a few days later than last year, but the trawl fleet is still fishing with only 30 percent of their 9,600-ton quota caught.

Obren Davis, area management biologist for the National Marine Fisheries Service, said a combination of factors led to a slower pot season.

IPHC ups halibut quotas

The International Pacific Halibut Commission boosted halibut quotas across most of the state at their annual meeting last week, reversing the downward trend of the past several years.

The quota statewide for the commercial fishery is 18.47 million pounds, up from 16.75 million pounds in 2014.

The breakdown by area is:

• Area 2C, Southeast Alaska, 3.8 million pounds, up from 3.32 million;

Transition team’s report puts priority on fish

Gov. Bill Walker’s office has released the report from his fisheries transition team which sets out priorities, recommendations and possible barriers to success for Alaska fisheries.

The document is concise and well organized, with careful thought to possible actions to achieve success, barriers to success and possible actions to address those barriers.

Chenault asks Walker to consider tossing out fish board

People across the state, including House Speaker Mike Chenault, are questioning the Board of Fisheries’ unanimous vote to not even interview one of the apparently qualified candidates, Roland Maw, for Alaska Department of Fish and Game commissioner, and the lack of public process in reaching that vote.

Chenault sent a strongly worded letter to Gov. Bill Walker asking him to look into it and to consider replacing the board.

Longliners, trawlers weigh in on bycatch

The halibut crisis in the Bering Sea and the potential for much stricter bycatch limits has the factory longliners and at-sea processing trawlers weighing in with comments to the International Pacific Halibut Commission, which meets Jan. 26-30. That’s something they have not previously done.

The directed fishery for halibut could go as low as 370,000 pounds next season, while nearly 5 million pounds could be tossed overboard as bycatch.

Public can comment on possible F&G chiefs

Time is running out for the public to weigh in on four applicants for commissioner of Alaska Department of Fish and Game as the boards prepare for a joint meeting to develop a list of names to forward to Gov. Bill Walker for consideration on Jan. 14.

Comments must be received by 5 p.m. Friday.

There has been some reporting that only four people applied for the position, but nothing on their qualifications.

Bycatch debate far from being finished

Bering Sea halibut fishermen narrowly missed getting a reduction of trawl bycatch at the latest North Pacific Fishery Management Council meeting after a tied vote on a petition for emergency action by the state of Alaska.

At issue are the drastic cuts being made to the directed halibut fishery in the Bering Sea and the lack of similar cuts to the bycatch mortality by trawlers.

Quota cuts seem to be helping halibut

There may finally be good news on the horizon for halibut fishermen, according to International Pacific Halibut Commission researcher Ian Stewart at IPHC’s interim meeting last week.

Stewart said that halibut are still growing more slowly than normal, their “size at age” is still under-performing for unknown reasons, but the drastic cuts from the past several years appear to be paying off.

Inclusive transition team earns high praise

The newly elected “unity team” of Gov. Bill Walker and Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott have received praise from all sides about their inclusive transition team of 250 Alaskans from all walks of life and all areas of expertise, open to the public and press.

The fisheries component was by far the largest team, made up of 25 members who can mainly be described as diverse, with people from all over the state, all political persuasions and all types of fisheries.

Study puts Steller sea lion declines into context

A recent study published in the journal “Fish and Fisheries” by anthropologist and archeologist Dr. Herbert Maschner sheds a more historical and prehistorical light on Steller sea lion populations in Western Alaska, and the effects of human interaction.

In 1997, National Marine Fisheries Service listed the western population of Steller sea lions as endangered after the population went from a high of 250,000 in 1977 to less than 100,000.

Study puts Steller sea lion declines into context

A recent study published in the journal “Fish and Fisheries” by anthropologist and archeologist Dr. Herbert Maschner sheds a more historical and prehistorical light on Steller sea lion populations in Western Alaska, and the effects of human interaction.

In 1997, National Marine Fisheries Service listed the western population of Steller sea lions as endangered after the population went from a high of 250,000 in 1977 to less than 100,000.

Homer top halibut port in poundage

 

The 2014 halibut season wrapped up last week with dock prices in Homer running about $6.60 per pound, well above the $6.15 per pound being paid for red king crab at the dock in Dutch Harbor, something of a head scratcher for seafood lovers.

The full season saw high prices, occasionally over $7 per pound, due to reduced inventory going into the season and drastically reduced quotas.

Study looks at potential of buyback in Bristol Bay

The Bristol Bay salmon fishery is one step closer to a potential buyback program with the release of a report by Northern Economics, commissioned by the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association, exploring various possible scenarios and structures of a buyback.

The study is in response to a survey sent out a year ago in which 81 percent of permit holders who sent it back said they would be interested in further information.

UAS course designed to help fishermen

The University of Alaska Southeast is offering an online, self-paced course in marine electrical systems for fishermen who want to be able to work on their own boats and know when to call the pros.

“It’s geared toward people like commercial fishermen, people who own a boat and want to do basic stuff,”  according to Amy Crews at UAS.

It’s also designed to help people see if the work is getting to the point  where they need to have a specialist come and take a look, she said.

New plan helps Mat-Su sport fishing interests

While most drift fishermen are grumbling about the lack of quality fishing time in the Upper Cook Inlet salmon fishery, the contentious new management plan hammered out last winter by the Board of Fisheries did seem to accomplish what the crafters of the plan, sport fishing interests in the Mat-Su Valley, intended.

Most Valley streams reached their sockeye escapement goals, and while the drift fleet was kept out of productive waters, coho salmon flooded into the area.

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