Arts

The Arts in Brief

HCOA presents Quixotic workshops

Quixotic, the Kansas City, Mo., performance group visiting for Salmonfest, conducts circus workshops next week at the Homer Council on the Arts. Workshops are presented in aerial fabric, dance trapeze and gym. Classes offered are:

• Aerial Fabric - Beginner (ages 8 and older): noon-1:30 p.m. Aug. 9, 10, 11, and 13. Fee: $175, HCOA members, $200, general

• Aerial Fabric - Intermediate: 1:45-3:15 p.m. Aug. 9, 10, 11, and 13. Fee: $175, HCOA members, $200, general

August art shows explore global warming

Two shows this month explore the effects of global warming and climate change, but from different perspectives.

In his show at Ptarmigan Arts, Homer artist Ed Hutchinsion, who has become known for his “white-on-white” paintings of Arctic animals, focuses on those animals and sea life dealing with climate change. He also expands his repertoire by merging his white-on-white style with a bold, colorist approach.

First Friday events

Art Shop Gallery

202 W. Pioneer Ave.

Homer Remembrances by Lisa Carlon

5-7:30 p.m., First Friday Opening Reception

Artist Lisa Carlon shows her 3D stained glass, including new designs of wildflowers, sandhill cranes and the Homer Spit. She also will have a selection of her suncatchers and other stained glass designs that reflect and capture Alaska wildlife.

Bunnell Street Arts Center

106 W. Bunnell Ave.

Decolonizing Alaska by various artists

Russian music stars in KPO's gala concerts

The final piece that the Kenai Peninsula Orchestra plays at its gala concerts this August will be the result of two years of passion and planning.

When Simon Nissen, the choir and world music instructor at Kenai Central High School and founding director of the Kenai Peninsula Singers, moved to the Kenai Peninsula about two years ago, he half-jokingly suggested to KPO Artistic Director Tammy Vollom-Matturo that they perform “Alexander Nevsky.”

A year later, KPO purchased the scores for the piece.

Wild Shore visits Homer

Wild Shore New Music, based in Alaska and New York City, join forces with the National Park Service for its Centennial to present a series of concerts in Alaska, New York City and Washington, D.C. Wild Shore performs two free concerts at noon Aug. 9, Land’s End Resort, and noon Aug. 11 at the Kenai Fine Arts Center, part of the Kenai Peninsula Orchestra Summer Music Festival. In collaboration with other musicians, they perform at 8 p.m. Aug. 11 at the Down East Saloon.

Arts in brief

Barbara Lavallee visits Art Shop Gallery

Artist Barbara Lavallee visits the Art Shop Gallery from 1-6 p.m. Saturday. She will sign new prints and personalize and sign old prints and books.

 

‘Grace & Glorie’ opens at Pier One Theatre

Rhythm of the North at HCOA

Johnny B.’s Rhythm of the North now shows at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Homer Council on the Arts. He will perform every Friday at 7:30 p.m. through Sept. 2. Admission is $12 HCOA member and $15 general admission. Tickets are available at HCOA and the Homer Bookstore.

His show also continues at Pier One Theater. He performs at 1 p.m. on cruise ship visits July 26, Aug. 9, Sept. 6 and Sept. 20. The multi-media extravaganza features his music coupled with videos of Alaska.

Mushroom guide revised, expanded by UAF report

Twenty-two years ago, Harriette Parker published “Alaska’s Mushrooms: A Practical Guide,” with photos and descriptions of 34 species of mushrooms, many of which she and her husband, Neil McArthur, found and photographed in the Homer area.

“Harriette had an interest in mushrooms when she used to live in New Brunswick in Canada, and she decided she wanted to write a mushroom book and she approached Alaska Northwest Books, who were independent at the time, and got a contract. And then we had to deal with it,” McArthur said, laughing.

Salmonfest announces early bird discount ends at midnight July 22

Early bird, discounted tickets for Salmonfest end at midnight July 22. Prices for a 3-day pass are $130 adults, $115 each for a four-pack of tickets, and $105 for teenagers 13-17 and seniors age 65 and older.

This year’s headline acts include the Indigo Girls, Trampled by Turtles and Quixotic Cirque Nouveau.

The three-day weekend festival features many of Alaska’s top food, crafts, art and brews, a family-friendly atmosphere, a daily children’s program, and four stages of national headliners and top Alaska bands.

Personal decisions define first book

Homer writer McKibben Jackinsky’s first book, “Too Close to Home? Living with ‘drill baby’ on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula” tells the story of recent oil and gas development on the southern peninsula through the voices of property owners who have been affected by that development.

Because Jackinsky is one of those property owners, it is also her story and her family’s story.

Clay, wood featured in First Friday shows

Heading into the Fourth of July weekend, July openings celebrate a freedom not often noted in art: media, not just subject.

At Bunnell Street Arts Center, Halibut Cove artist Annette Bellamy continues her experimentation with clay art forms.

Bellamy has become known for using clay as a sculptural medium, shaping works that seem everyday and stripping form almost to the abstract. Like Antoinette Walker, also showing at Bunnell, Bellamy comes from a commercial fishing background.

Both artists explore maritime themes, with Walker painting highly detailed encaustics.

First Friday

Art Shop Gallery

202 W. Pioneer Ave.

New work by Taz Talley

5-7:30 p.m., First Friday Opening Reception

Homer photographer Taz Tally shows his new image of fireweed casting its seed, along with other black and white images printed on metal.

Bunnell Street Arts Center

106 W. Bunnell Ave.

Encaustic painting by Antoinette Walker

Ceramic art by Annette Bellamy

5-7 p.m., First Friday Opening Reception; 6 p.m., artists talk

New mural replaces Heath Street art

A mural project on a Kachemak Center retaining wall by Heath Street stirred up some controversy this month when people noticed a 25-year-old art work had been painted over. “Life Song,” conceived by Homer artist Jean Steele and painted by students in a 1991 Homer Council on the Arts summer art program, had fallen badly into disrepair.

“My bible to mural making is never cover up an artist,” said Kady Perry, the Bunnell Street Arts Center artist in resident who has been leading mural workshops during her six-week residency.

Arts In Brief

Salmonfest announces full lineup

Salmonfest has announced its full musical acts lineup. To be held Aug. 5-7 at the Kenai Peninsula Fair grounds in Ninilchik, the festival features a weekend of music, food and fish. The four-stage extravaganza includes more than 50 acts. During the festival, many of Alaska’s top food, crafts, art and brews are available throughout the grounds in a family friendly atmosphere, including a daily children’s program.

Creating writers with community

Creating writers through community

From the outside, the Kachemak Bay Writers’ Conference may seem like any other event taking place at Land’s End Resort, but a step closer reveals a strong community of growing individuals unified by a passion for putting words on a page — for creating a story.

Over the conference, attendees are given a plethora of options for workshops, panels, writing circles, and — perhaps most importantly — sharing.

Pier One Theatre Summer Schedule

Johnny B.’S Rhythm Of The North

June 14-Sept. 20

1, 3 p.m.

Alternate Tuesdays

 

William Shakespeare’s Star Wars

Pier One Fundraiser

7:30 p.m. June 16 and 17

 

Fresh Produce Improvisation

7:30 p.m. June 18 and 19

 

Youth Theatre sharing performance

3, 7 p.m. June 24

7 p.m. June 25

 

Rosencrantz And Guildenstern Are Dead

7:30 p.m., July 1-3, 7-10, 14-16

 

Grace and Glorie

7:30 p.m., July 22-24, 28-30

 

Youth Theatre camps to share with community

Not only does Pier One entertain Homer with quality plays, but it also provides youth with the opportunity to learn about acting with hands on experience through youth theatre camps.

Jennifer Norton, along with many other members of the Pier One community, firmly believes in the benefits of theatre camp.

“It’s just such a wonderful opportunity, getting kids used to speaking in public,” said Norton, also adding spontaneity and helping kids get used to new situations as benefits of theatre camps.

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